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20121027
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the middle eastern studies program here at george mason. professor, how would you describe syria's economy as far as its structure? >> guest: syria's economy went through a number of changes. it went from a centralized state hood economy to a mixed economy that involved centralized aspects and some market aspects, but not in the manner that actually allowed the market to be efficient at all. >> host: when did this change occur from centralized to mixed? >> guest: most of the countries, the late developing countries, after the post colonial development, they had a period where they actually had to involve the masses in order to gain support and legitimacy. when this process, for a variety of reasons, began to create problems for the regimes and power and when external support and pressure for some of the regimes and for some of the directions that were available at the time in terms of moving towards the market economy around the 1980s took place, you saw a lot of these third world regimes or the global house begin to move from a state centered economy to a more market oriented economy, and
'm ali velshi. recent polls show a dead heat in the presidential election. the economy is still issue number one and the very voters who could decide this election are still undecided. >> i try and keep an open mind. >> i have not heard anything of substance. >> i'm looking for more. i mean we're talking about another four years. >> the questions are all about the economy. >> i'm not up at the white house. i don't see rich people all the time but i see a lot of poor people. >> microcosm of the issues we're facing in america. you can find every one of the major issues that were involved in the great recession. housing. >> when the whole mortgage debacle happened the banks weren't lending any more money. >> social security, medicare. >> it's a life saver for me. >> i want medicare preserved. >> cut other things besides medicare. >> this is a state where a quarter of the population is over the age of 60. that's the biggest proportion anywhere in the united states. so these people are concerned about every part of the economy. they want answers as to who is going to be best for them. >> t
. and $50 billion in losses. and now for some good news for the economy. the president's re-election campaign. the economy beat a consensus of economists expectations added 184,000 new jobs last month and the private sector while it shed 13,000 public sector jobs, netting out a gain of 171,000 jobs. and revised employment reports forage and september added another 84,000. givingunemployment is higher, giving mitt romney a talking point. >> unemployment today is higher than on the day barack obama took office. >> eliot: what he didn't say was that the economy was losing 800,000 jobs a month when obama took office. during his term the economy added millions of jobs. professor at us berkeley goldman school of public policy and author of "beyond outrage: what has gone wrong with our economy and our democracy and how to fix it." hello, mr. secretary. >> hello eliot. >> eliot: there was a massive conspiracy that the economy was picking up steam. do you think the numbers prove there is an accelerating fact that there improvement. >> the reason why unemployment ticked up was because
of the "wall street journal," economy grows at 2% pace. consumers, government spending, powered third-quarter gains, but growth likely to slow down. and that's what we want to talk to you about for the first 45 minutes of this edition of the "washington journal." good morning. today is saturday, october 27. we want to talk to you about your optimism or pessimism about the economy. things getting better? things getting worse? are you doing all right? could you be doing better? we want to talk to you about the economy, your optimism, and your pessimism in terms of your personal economy and not necessarily how you feel the candidates will do, what they might do for the economy once they get elected. 202-585-3881 for republicans. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. and you can also reach out to us via social media. the address on twitter, @spanwj. facebook.com/cspan. and email, journal@c-span.org. more from the article this morning from the "wall street journal," economy grows at 2% pace. josh mitchell and refugee write -- -- and jeffrey write -- host: we'll take
to get this economy soaring again. so who should you choose? we're hours from the election. these men are delivering closing arguments, making their final case for your vote. it's an election about the economy, so let's look at the evidence. jobs. president obama's argument, he's gained back every job lost under his watch. that's quite a feat, but romney says not good enough. >> we're going to create 12 million new jobs and more take-home pay. >> reporter: >> how is that possible, major economic growth. the economy grew at a 2% annual rate during the third quarter, better but not nearly enough to significantly boost hiring. romney will be much more than that to keep his jobs promise. how about housing. prices in some areas are rising, foreclosures slowing, but this is america and what will really get the economy going again is you. consumer spending rising, consumer confidence the best in four years. there's no doubt president obama inherited an economy in crisis, and his supporters will tell you he's turned things around. >> we have made real progress. >> his final argument, he deser
, and it is still all about the economy. so we'll start with a great panel it to see talk about the american economy, who is actually going on. >>> then, you've often heard that fracking is controversial. why? we have a debate to help you think it through. >>> and do you think you have enough money? what would be enough? we'll have a fascinating discussion on the subject with lord robert skidelsky, britain's most prominent economic historian o how to answer those questions. >>> and why in the world did the nation of mali get more mention this week in the debate than all of japan, mexico, or europe? >>> first, my take. the international monetary fund's latest world economic outlook makes for gloomy roading. growth projections have been revised downward almost everywhere, especially in europe and the big emerging markets like china. yet when looking out over the next four years, coincidentally the next presidential term, the imf projects that the united states will be the strongest of the world's rich economies. u.s. growth is forecast to average 3%, much stronger than that was germany or france, at 1
for a second a look at the economy, generally speaking, you have states important swing states where the unemployment rate is lower than the national average. but the recent set of data we see a brightening of consumer attitudes. we see consumer sentiment and surprisingly at a five-year high despite historically high gas prices. despite a lot of the concerns that this is our expressing. we've seen really weak investment and orders in particular. so whether consumer sentiment will continue to hold up and importantly whether that will actually suggest that voters are in a better mood than even the economic figures suggest, could give obama some more support than you might otherwise see and what's relatively weak period of growth. >> whoever it is elected in november is going to be looking at a real takeoff of the economy. all this money that'scying on the sidelines is put to work -- that's sitting on the sidelines is put to work. the u.s. is attractive compared to others around the world. the takeoff is scoming but won't come in time. chris: a lot of things going on. every voter has to
of japan steps in to boost the economy for a second straight month with another easing move. welcome back, everybody. one hour of the good stuff today. plenty to get through today for hurricane sandy, as well. >> europe went off daylight savings time a week ahead of the u.s. back to full schedule next week. in the meantime, sandy is no longer a hurricane by name, but still making a major impact. storm made landfall monday night along new jersey east koer. still packing hurricane force sandy is expected to weaken, but the rain could linger. already at least ten deaths have been blamed on the storm. u.s. markets will be closed for a second day today. still electronic trading. the last time by the way the new york stock exchange was closed for more than a day because of weather, 1888. when a snowstorm piled up to 40-foot drifts. u.s. refineries had to shut nearly all the east coast fuel supplies ahead of sandy and they'll begin assessing damage today. three of the key six refineries shut down. analysts estimate sandy could cost between $5 billion and $10 billion in ensured losses. it would b
, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be true in this case? >> well, no. this is a natural disaster. disasters are bad for the economy. obviously, the big hit to the economy initially, is what we're seing in new york. you do get rebuilding, and economy benefits from that, but net, net, the economy is in a worse place. natural disasters are bad for the economy, not good. >> susie: you heard in erica's remit some businesses are going to benefit, maybe hox*echl builders and cuk companies. if you look at the economy, who are the winners and losers in terms of various sectors? >> well, there's more losers than winners. the losers would be the restaurants, they're not going to serve meals that aren't getting served. airlines, trucking companies, you know, the casinos fnlt fshs services. the secretaried to and trading is shutownor a couple of days, never get that back. the winners are clear. the homebuilders, home improvement, you mentioned home depot and loews and hardware stores. online retailers might benefit because department stores are closed. so some winn
think it's been a very tough spot for the world economy. and it's not that comfortable but i think you did see the first year dramatic decline and then since that first year, 15 months you've seen some pretty substantial recovery that still has a long way to go before people are going to feel like we're fully recovered. >> austan, let me jump in there. we do still have a long way to go. a couple of charts that a supporter of governor romney would hope people would focus on. first labor force participation rate. it rose slightly to 63.8%. look at this number. back to 1981. let me give you another one. second, the so-called underemployment rate now stands at 14.6%. hey, that's a little bit better. but you know what? this is still a number that a lot of people say is the real feel unemployment rate. >> you're getting -- let's not get a little confused. if you take that real unemployment rate, that's down substantially more over the last three years than the observed regular unemployment rate is down. so you don't want to compare two different numbers. you should take any series and look a
their attention back to the economy today; investors and traders liked what they heard. americans are feeling the most optimistic they have been in nearly five years about their finances and the outlook for the economy. the conference board's confidence index jumped to a reading of 72.2 last month. driving that gain, an improving job market. new ai for unemployment insurance fell by 9,000 in the past week to 363,000, showing modest improvement in the jobs picture. we'll have more on jobs in a moment. as for stocks, the dow gained 136 points, the nasdaq was up 42, the s&p adding 15. >> susie: but economists say that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: fr and a ha mlion pple are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and
or simply his view is what is best for the economy, but it's a very similar proposal in my estimation and i wish that we could move ahead with them being like this then you would be tremendous benefit icing for the taxpayers to get some usefulness out of this investment that they have made in the gses and keeping them together and functioning, to use the skeleton, to use the infrastructure and awaited that allows the taxpayer to get a benefit, to get some monetization of the investment that is then made over time. .. >> i have made my decision to leave freddie mac because i thought it was going to take a long time before we would get resolution. unfortunately, i joined the company the middle of 2009. at that point, everyone was certain that the company would be relaunched at some point. possibly in a couple of years. obviously, we have been disappointed in that. as the calendar rolled through three or four years, i concluded looking at my birth certificate that i probably wasn't going to make it. that was one indication of my pessimism about when we were going to get this resolved. it was c
don't vote we could have bush versus gore all over again. the economy, stupid. friday the last jobs report before the election. last month, it gave the president a boost. will the october number matter more? i'm chris matthews. welcome to the show. with us today, "time" magazine's joe klein. the bbc's katty kay. cnbc's kelly evans. and "the washington post's" david ignatius. first up, we're staring down at the wind tunnel now but historic perfect political storm in the coming nine days of this campaign. and these closing days when we played out in mind games on both sides. the president saying he jist wants to hold on -- he just wants to hold on. >> what we have is a lead that we've maintained throughout this campaign. and we are going to just continue to drive home the message that there are two fundamentally different choices in this election. about where we take the country. chris: and he's on the air with a fear factor ad. >> 537. the number of votes that changed the course of american history. >> florida is too close to call. >> so this year, if you're thinking that your vote d
the economy is that investment, and the fact it's declining? wow, that's really a bad sign. neil: scott, a better future indicator? what so many ceos are saying i'm preparing for the worst just in case. suspect that a more telling future? >> yeah, look at consumer spending numbers. the positive note is it increased, but guess what? it's down from the first quarter and down from last year so you're right, the businesses look at the dollars from the wallets saying, hey, they are not flying out of there. if you look the the investment numbers, convicting to gdp last year and the year prior, which, by the way, gdp, 1.7%, below the trend this year, 3% in 2010. the economy's deaccelerating. neil: adam, do you think of that? >> well, things could be better. fact of the matter is the economy is growing. it's not growing as much as we'd like it to grow, but it is growing. >> not as fast as before. >> the housing sector's recovering, key, it should recover. it's been down for so long, and the financial system is sound, you know, balance sheets generally good, so we can focus on the negative, or,
and comprehensive response to the financial crisis, an event that devastated the american economy, cost the american people trying to dollars and millions of jobs and undermine the confidence in our financial system requires if it is to drive and support a growing economy. the sweeping scope of this financial reform legislation sometimes it secures the fact that despite its breath, and is rooted in the handful of sound principles that should have been more firmly in place before the crisis in his embrace serves to make markets more stable and efficient. simple principles, like markets should be transparent, regulation should be consistent without gaps that can be exploited by those who wish to indulge in risky, destabilizing or even illegal behavior. market participants, not taxpayer should read the risk market activities and regulator should have willingness in both the need to apply these principles to the day-to-day workings of the financial markets. the dodd-frank actress at a principles into the foundation for effective regulation. interestingly, the title of the historic legislation seems to s
about longer delays, and return to normal production and slightly bigger hit on the economy. s this's certainly true. >> tom: what about the impact on the job market. we were supposed to have the october jobs numbers this friday. still expected to come out. not going to be impacted because of this storm but what about november's numbers? >> that's a great question. sometime these major events, those storms are right in the mile of the reference period during which bls measures employment. but sandy is occurring almost directly between october's reference month and november's reference month, actually-- impact of this on the official government numbers for employment. >> tom: just 20 seconds left but damage to confidence at all, consumer confidence? >> no, i think not. people are resilient. they will see through this. they'll get back to the business of rebuilding which of course is a plus for gdp and back to that activity very quickly. >> we hope it happens faster than not. joeling prkenith us, a lookt the economy, macroeconomic advisors. it may seem a bit premature to talk about th
, what's your take on the markets right now and this storm? how does it impact the economy and the markets from here? >> i think it's modestly constructive. i think we're still in the middle of the square root shaped economic recovery we've been in for over three years now. a grinding upward trend within the data. i think you saw some of the positive news. i think the chinese numbers were a little stronger than many had figured. so the global economy may not be decelerating as quickly as many had feared, but certainly earnings are going to trump a lot of investors coming into the season. i think coming into the fourth quarter, earnings are going to be critical but revenue is going to be extremely critical in an economic environment that's grindsi grinding upward. >> kevin, what about you? i know you're growing increasingly pessimistic about the impact of the fiscal cliff. what else is becoming a drag in terms of uncertainty on in economy and the market? >> i think right now markets are too complacent about the fiscal cliff. a lot of people assume things are going to get wor
to start the day. i mean, one of the great entrepreneurs of the american economy, steve case, who not only has such incredible impact with aol, but now with revolution is funding and helping to develop a whole range of companies in a variety of industries. meanwhile, living in the washington area has gotten incredibly involved in trying to help the u.s. government think more intelligently about competitiveness and entrepreneurship in particular. then josh linkner, a local star here who runs detroit venture partners as i'm sure many of you know, if you're from detroit, you certainly know that, a supporter of this event which we're very grateful for, and i think symbolic of the incredible new energy that's developing in detroit. and i should also say that josh created a company calls eprize in 1999 here in detroit. it's been operating all this time. two weeks ago it sold for a nice exit. [applause] so here's the story of a local company that came from here, went all the way and, you know, he's done real well with that. meanwhile, he's invested in a ton of other companies. so i just want to s
in the economy, which is this big, darker issue that the country is facing right now. it's worrying people a lot. and so, the idea that he can talk about things like the binders comment, which is really just a play off a comment that mitt romney made during the presidential debate, where he talks about his desire to hire a lot of women. and it's not helping him. i think that's reflected in the poll numbers because you're seeing right now romney is tied, or seems to have a kind of momentum moving into the time week. that's just what pollsters are saying. i think democrats feel that this will help particularly with women voters, because they make up the majority, and if they can kind of put forward this argument that mitt romney wants to take away somethings that are very important to them, then they can get the edge amongst that party leck rate. which in a very close election can be really critical. host: thank you both for being with us on this news maker for this sunday. >> watch our newsmakers with rande paul again today at 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. now watch our coverage of the presidentia
. >> thank you for that report from geneva. the u.s. economy is at the heart of the presidential election. in less than two hours, a key jobs figures will be released. 100,000 new jobs need to be created every month to keep up with the growing population. president obama and his rival mitt romney have a matter of days to swing voters their way. the mayor of new york knows who he will support. michael bloomberg says superstorm sandy has helped him make up his mind. rally inent obama's colorado in 2008, a young adoring crowd. >> are you fired up? [cheers] >> the placards or different, but the change is still on the agenda. it is just that change takes time, he says. >> you know where i stand and you know i'm willing to make tough decisions even when they are not politically convenient. [cheers and applause] >> the looked like he was enjoying himself, which was not always the case in this campaign. people wondered after he still had a fight in him, after his first debate. he also had good reason to smile. the unexpected backing of new york mayor michael bloomberg, out from managing the city'
as the race for the white house reaches its conclusion. no mat wrer i ter where i go, t economy is the most important issue in this election. i've been traveling with john avalon. he joins me now as does my good friend christine romans. she joins me from washington. jim acosta from did he back to you, iowa, where mitt romney just landed. brianna keeler is in milwaukee, wisconsin, traveling with president obama. let's start here in ohio. the state has a very complex economy. here's some of what we've been hearing from voters on this trip. >> just a lot of depressed areas. a lot of joblessness. >> just looking at the unemployment rate, it's so scary to me. >> the last four years has not been very good for our small business. >> with the debt crisis, our country has, that burden is going to be on us in the future. >> all of the skills i had are obsolete now. >> i'm not up at the white house. i don't see rich people all the time. i see a lot of poor people. >> shut down, closed, reduced wages, ship the jobs overseas. we lost 55,000 factories. >> we're probably never have the things that we did
economies. it took a long time for the -- it takes cities to drive the national economies. it took a long time for us remember that. we are joined by an adjunct professor at wayne state. most importantly, he works for city governments. gordon feller, michael littlejohn and you have heard from carla. it is very hard to moderate. all i want to do is tweet. i wanted to start with a question that really build off presentation. this can be a very broad conversation. we are talking about efficiency and how we manage congestion and lower energies. we are talking about the integration of data. we are talking about participation was social media, co-production of solution. david mentioned this. the united states is not quite at the vanguard of this. when i think it can just in, i think about singapore. he brought the copenhagen. i want to start with the ibm and cisco part of the world appeared word you see progress within cities? where is the u.s. -- part of the world. where do you see progress within cities? where in the u.s.? >> we can point to smarter transportation and public safety and health
economy. so thank you, erick. [applause] >> thank you. it's great to be here. h let me just quickly introduce our panelists. please have a seat. to my immediate left is grady burnett who's vice president of global marketing at facebook and lived in ann arbor for many years, so he's a local. mark hatch is the ceo of tech shop which has a recent facilita that opened up here not too far from the airport, we'll be talking about what we do there. danae ringelmann is the co-founder and coo of indiegogo, and david ten have is the ceo of ponoko which is a very interesting platform for manufacturing. what we're going to talk about today is the do-it-yourselfy, economy and how, how different h tools have become available to entrepreneurs beyond just whatav we've become accustomed to in the internet world. so the cost of producing a start-up, you know, has declined dramatically in the past decade, and we've seen this flowering of internet and mobile start-ups. but we're also starting to see many of those same tactics and techniques being used by start-ups in the other industries and particular
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)